BienDong.Net

Vietnam's Press

A Feast to commemorate the 4th anniversary of the PCA South China Sea Ruling

E-mail Print PDF

PCADifferent from the last three years, this year is marked with the high-profile 4thanniversary of the PCA South China Sea Ruling. Various events to praise the rule of law in the South China Sea took place.

1. The ‘feast’ begins with a message from the Philippines Foreign Secretary on July 12th 2020. July 12th was the exact day four years ago when The Hague Tribunal issued a ruling rejecting China’s sovereignty claims over most of the South China Sea.

In his message, Foreign Secretary Teodoro Locsin Jr. stated that the PCA South China Sea Ruling 2016 was “non-negotiable”, and called for China’s serious compliance with the ruling. Mr Locsin also underscored that the ruling “conclusively settled the issue of historic rights and maritime entitlements in the South China Sea… under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982 (UNCLOS)”.

By adducing China’s acts in violation of international law cited by the Tribunal, including massive reclamation and construction of artificial features in the South China Sea with severe environmental impacts, Mr Locsin stressed the Tribunal’s conclusion that certain actions of China within the Philippines’ Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) violated the Philippines’ sovereign rights and “were thus unlawful”.

Read more...

Can Cam Ranh Bay-Port Blair-Djibouti form a strategic Maritime chain hub to tackle China?

E-mail Print PDF

Can Cam Ranh BayThe world at present is grappling with the Global Pandemic Coronavirus, but Chinese maritime security aggressiveness in the East China Sea, South China Sea and off late the Indian Ocean is at an all high. This belligerence and expansionism by China in the international waters is a major cause of concern for most countries. Keeping Chinese aggressiveness in mind, the article tries to suggest a strategic line of maritime hubs which can be called a chain of maritime hubs to tackle China.

This year in April, a Vietnamese fishing vessel in the South China Sea was sunk by a Chinese ship. Viet Nam garnered a lot of support from the United States where the United States State Department “criticised China for ramming and sinking the Vietnamese fishing boat and was seriously concerned about this incident”.

Read more...

US military commander says China pushing South China Sea claims under cover of COVID-19

E-mail Print PDF

tải xuống 1TOKYO: China is using the coronavirus as a cover to push territorial claims in the South China Sea through a surge in naval activity meant to intimidate other countries that claim the waters, the commander of United States Forces in Japan said on Friday (Jun 5).

There has been a surge of activity by China in the South China Sea with navy ships, coast guard vessels and a naval militia of fishing boats harassing vessels in waters claimed by Beijing, said Lieutenant General Kevin Schneider.

"Through the course of the (COVID-19) crisis we saw a surge of maritime activity," he told Reuters in a phone interview. He said Beijing had also increased its activity in the East China Sea, where it has a territorial dispute with Japan.

Beijing's increased level of activity would likely continue, predicted Schneider: "I don't see troughs, I see plateaus," he said.

Read more...

Vietnam- France cooperation in COVID-19 fight under discussion

E-mail Print PDF

VNFrancecoopThe pair noted with satisfaction great strides in their countries’ strategic partnership politics, economy, trade, aerospace, healthcare, environment protection, education-training, culture and tourism, while highlighting huge potential for the development of bilateral cooperation in the time to come.

The French PM recalled his visit to Vietnam in 2018 and agreed that both nations need to step up communication to devise measures aimed at developing the strategic partnership in a more extensive and effective manner.

Edouard Philippe applauded Vietnam’s efforts in the COVID-19 fight and thanked the Vietnamese Government and people for their medical supplies for his country, which he said indicate the sentiment and close ties between the two nations.

Read more...

US rejects China maritime claims in South China Sea

E-mail Print PDF

US rejects China maritime claims in South China SeaBEIJING — A look at recent developments in the South China Sea, where China is pitted against smaller neighbors in multiple territorial disputes over islands, coral reefs and lagoons. The waters are a major shipping route for global commerce and are rich in fish and possible oil and gas reserves.

US REJECTS CHINA MARITIME CLAIMS

The U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations has fired back at Chinese territorial claims in the South China Sea.

Ambassador Kelly Craft's note weighs in on Malaysia's behalf in its bid to reject China-imposed limits on its continental shelf allowing it rights to resources.

"The United States rejects these maritime claims as inconsistent with international law as reflected in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention," Craft's note said.

China in December issued a rejection of Malaysia's petition to extend its continental shelf. Beijing ignored a 2016 ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague that invalidated most of China's claims to virtually the entire South China Sea.

Click the link for the original article

In letter to UN Chief, Indonesia takes stand on South China Sea

E-mail Print PDF

In letter to UN Chief Indonesia takes stand on South China SeaIndonesia added its weight to recent diplomatic moves by ASEAN members opposing Beijing’s claims in the South China Sea, sending a rare diplomatic note to the head of the United Nations earlier this week.

The letter, sent to U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres on Tuesday, spelled out the Indonesian government’s support for a 2016 ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, when the court sided with the Philippines in a case that Manila brought against China over a territorial dispute in the sea.

“Indonesia reiterates that the Nine-Dash line map implying historic rights claim clearly lacks international legal basis and is tantamount to upset UNCLOS 1982,” said the letter from Indonesia’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations, referring to a boundary on Chinese maps that encompasses Beijing’s claims in the maritime region.

“As a State Party to UNCLOS 1982, Indonesia has consistently called for the full compliance toward international law, including UNCLOS 1982. Indonesia hereby declares that it is not bound by any claims made in contravention to international law, including UNCLOS 1982,” the letter stated.

Click the link for the original article

Would a US-India cooperation break the legal stalemate in the South China Sea?

E-mail Print PDF

Would a USIndia cooperation break the legal stalemate in the South China SeaA year after his presidential election, in November 2017, President Donald Trump made his first trip to five Asian countries and on his Twitter account, he expressed his honor of being present at the center of the Indo - Pacific region. Subsequently, in December 2017, the US announced the National Security Strategy (NSS), to be followed by the National Defense Strategy (NDS) in January 2018. Concurrently in 2018, the US changed the name of the Pacific Command to the Indo-Pacific Command, and also indicated that India is an important security partner of Washington. These moves have signaled the formation of the US vision of a “free and open” Indo-Pacific region that includes India and countries bordering the Indian Ocean. This region, as a matter of fact, is considered to be closely integrated geographically and politically with the rest of the Asia-Pacific. More importantly, the United States has now formally considered India as having a critical role to play in the US’ grand scheme in the Indo-Pacific. Would the US’ more comprehensive approach to the region which includes the strengthening of India's involvement and rebranding Washington’s Indo-Pacific Command possible help align both the US and India’s security interests, especially when China’s recent acts are seen as destabilizing regional order.

First, it is worth noting that the US-India bilateral ties have strengthened and improved, especially in security and defense. In July 2019, US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper told members of the Senate Armed Forces Committee that the overall goal of the US is to strengthen the long-term “strategic partnership” based on a strong defense cooperation with a capable Indian military forces in order to address common concerns in the region. What Mark Esper said is not without foundation as in the past few years, US-India bilateral defense trade increases significantly, of which the quantity and categories of defense equipment India imported from the US multiplied. The US has become India’s largest weapon supplier. At the same time, military exchanges are also pushed up with regular meetings of the US and Indian army staffs. The two sides are negotiating military cooperation agreements, of which two have already been signed. The positive developments in the US-India defense ties lead many to an early forecast the future US-India relations might become a formal alliance irrespective of India’s membership in the Non-Aligned Movement, past US support for Pakistan and India’s once reliance on Moscow’s advanced weaponry. It is unclear whether these forecasts would come true. However, as long as India continues to upgrade its relations with the US and Japan as well as maintains its posture as a reliable defense partner through a combination of arms trade with joint exercises with these two countries, the US-India relationship will surely continue to develop in a positive direction.

Read more...

The fallout from Philippine President’s cancellation of the US-Philippines Visiting Forces Agreement

E-mail Print PDF

The fallout from Philippine Presidents cancellation of the US-Philippines Visiting Forces AgreementDespite being dubbed “US’ non-NATO ally” in Asia, on February 11, 2020, the Western Pacific island nation of the Philippines saw President Rodrigo Duterte “shock” the public by filing the termination of the “Visiting Forces Agreement” (VFA) between the Philippines and the US. Basically, the agreement allows activities such as US-Philippines joint military exercises, training and humanitarian aid within Philippine territory which approximates 300 every year, including visits from US warships. Ratified by Senate of the Philippines in 1998, the VFA came into effect in 1999 as a continuation of the “Mutual Defense Treaty” (MDT) signed in 1951 between the two countries, marking the alliance between the Philippines and the US. Such an unexpected decision from the Philippine leadership had stirred up the public within and without the region, especially those in the Philippines itself.

Firstly, the public is very much interested in President Duterte’s reason for the termination. In this regard, the general consensus is that there are both direct and indirect causes. The root cause remains President Duterte’s implementation of a step-by-step policy to “separate from the US” and “pivot to China” in exchange for economic benefits, which would help realize the “Build, Build, Build” strategy he himself set out.

As things stand, China is a regional power about to realize its dream of becoming a global "superpower”. China does not hide its ambition, but the rise of China has been the cause for concerns for many countries in the region, especially with regard to territorial issues. When it comes to the South China Sea, China has expressed its intention to “monopolize control” of nearly the entire South China Sea area through the unreasonable "nine-dash line" claim. During a 2016 visit to Singapore, a senior Chinese leader boldly stated, “I repeat, the South China Sea has long been China’s”. Despite being a signatory to the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS 1982), Beijing has repeatedly shown disregard for international law in its statements and acts of “bullying” in the South China Sea. In 2016, the International Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) ruled in favor of Manila on the case brought by the Philippines against China relating to sovereignty disputes in the South China Sea and China blatantly rejected this Ruling. Many ASEAN countries are troubled by China's ambitions and increasing aggressiveness in the South China Sea. However, given their weak capabilities, many governments in the region feel the need to develop relations with China to attract Chinese investment. President Duterte’s administration is no exception.

Read more...

China is using Covid-19 pandemic to step up encroachment in the South China Sea

E-mail Print PDF

China is using Covid19 pandemic to step up encroachment in the South China SeaAs experts have warned, once China proclaimed that the Wuhan epidemic outbreak was under control, they would take advantage of the complicated global context, especially those in the US and Europe, to conduct new activities in the South China Sea.

On the ground, Chinese ships continuously travel from Hainan island to seven outposts illegally occupied in Spratly Islands to prove their regular presence in the South China Sea. Not once has China ceased their encroachment, even amidst the novel corona virus outbreak.

Read more...

China’s Chance to Demonstrate Leadership in the South China Sea

E-mail Print PDF

Chance to Demonstrate Leadership in the South China SeaChina, in a series of assertive and sometimes risky unilateral actions, has netted some significant gains in the South China Sea in the past decade. The island outposts it has constructed in the Spratly and Paracel Islands are strategic assets in both war and peace. Together with the vast fishing and law enforcement patrols they enable, the outposts provide unprecedented maritime domain awareness capabilities across the South China Sea and serve as a springboard to extend China’s reach even further into Southeast Asia, the Pacific, and the Indian Ocean.

Beijing seems intent on translating this maritime superiority into a de facto victory in the disputes. On the water, its grey zone operations aim to increase the costs of Vietnamese, Malaysian, and Philippine hydrocarbon and fishing operations to the point where they can no longer operate within the nine-dash line, which denotes China’s vast maritime claim. It has simultaneously pushed for a major geopolitical victory within the negotiations on a Code of Conduct with the ASEAN states, where China has tried to gain a veto right over joint military exercises between claimants and countries from outside the region as well as an outright ban on cooperation with extraregional countries on oil and gas.

Click the link for the original article

Learning in the South China Sea: The U.S response to the West Capella standoff

E-mail Print PDF

Learning in the South China Sea The U.S response to the West Capella standoffMalaysian oil exploration in a contested area of the South China Sea sparked a “five-nation face off” in April, with Malaysian, Vietnamese, Chinese, U.S., and Australian maritime forces sailing within relatively close proximity. When the responding U.S. Navy Expeditionary Strike Group departed after spending only a few days in the area, some observers panned the U.S. response as uninvited, insufficient, and having emboldened China. The passage of a few weeks has shown these accusations to be premature, but also highlighted a recurring weakness in the U.S. approach to maritime security in the Indo-Pacific. While the U.S. strike group may have departed, U.S. forces sortied from both forward deployed locations and the U.S. homeland to maintain a persistent presence over the South China Sea with platforms ranging from small surface combatants to strategic bombers. China’s presence has remained largely static. Overall, the United States shows progress in its approach but also an inexplicable missed opportunity to reach out to its Southeast Asian partners.

Click the link for the original article

Page 1 of 3

  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »
Joomlart